Cuaba Divinos Cigar - 1 Single

Cuaba Divinos Cigar - 1 Single
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Description Ref # CU0201

Flavour: Medium to Full
Length: 4" (101mm)
Ring Gauge: 43 ring gauge
Packaging: Single Cigar

Tasting Notes

The odd one out in the Cuaba range due to their different cap construction, being flat and not pointed the current batch have superb colorado maduro dark and oily wrappers and taste slightly fuller in terms of flavour than the rest of the range. The darker wrappers give a slightly sweeter taste with hints of spice and underlying earthy tones that are very pleasing. A good, sweet finish that leaves you wanting another one.

Reviews

Displaying 1 to 5 (of 16 reviews)
Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  [Next >>] 
by Simon on Monday 04 September, 2017
I ordered this as part of a CGars sampler and it was lovely little cigar, that surprised me completely. My first impressions, were of a draw slightly too tight for my liking, however this was accompanied by such a rich and sweet aroma, a full creamy smoke and a very pleasant spicy, nutty sweetness. The draw opened up a little to become more acceptable a little way in to the smoke, making this a cigar that was hard to put down. What I initially thought was going to be a bit of a chore, became the first cigar I have ever smoked until I burnt my fingers! Overall, it is a charming and unusual cigar, with a quaint and old fashioned look and feel to it, but as far as flavour is concerned, I would rate it very highly. I will be ordering more and as the description says, it leaves you wanting more.
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by Darren on Friday 21 April, 2017
Smoked a divinos last weekend and was really enjoyable. Great even burn, nice ash and loads of smoke. Nice flavours as well. Will definitely buy more. Great smoke that lasted me around 40 mins give or take.
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by Samuel on Sunday 02 April, 2017
I enjoyed this cigar, it did have a slightly tight draw and some very minor issues with construction but was still a very pleasant smoke with lovely sweet, nutty and slightly woody flavours. I do have cheaper cigars that I prefer but I still think this is a great smoke and I would purchase again.
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by Staff on Friday 03 June, 2016
Reviewed by Kevin Reed (May 2003) I'm not normally a fan of smaller cigars but THESE are an interesting looking smoke. I got them from CGARS Ltd yesterday and although I know I should let them lie a while in the humidor, I'm going to leave that for when I buy a box. After all, it's a new month and there's a new review to be written ;-) and these are crying out to be smoked - if you hold one up to your ear you can hear it - honest !! I'll take it that they've been very well looked after in MO's humidor. So......first a little background on the Cuaba brand for those needing a little hard fact. Up until the beginning of this century, the figurado shape (or perfecto if we're being picky), pointed at both ends and bulbous in the middle, was the most popular in the world. With figurado's returning to fashion in the mid-90's, Cuaba was introduced in London in 1996, the brand being the first new Cuban cigar brand to be introduced into commercial production since 1968. "Cuaba" is the Taino Indian word for the special Cuban bush used to light the "Cohiba" or "Tobacco" on the Island used during religious ceremonies. Cuaba cigars are made at the Romeo y Julieta Factory (now Briones Montoto) under the supervision of Master Roller Izquierdo Gonzalez. This figurado shape is very difficult to make as it has to be made without the use of a cigar mould so don't be surprised if, upon opening a box, you find that no two cigars are identical. Rolled on the thighs of Cuban virgins ? Doubtful. But rolled on the thighs of a master of his art ? Very possibly. We shall see. OK.....the history lesson's over, now to the cigar. You know how some cigars just feel "right" when you hold them ? Picking one of these up is a small pleasure in itself. For a short cigar, they're very tactile, very ergonomic. A quick examination shows a relatively vein-free, rustic looking colorado-maduro wrapper. Not so much "Totalemente a mano" as "Definitivamente a mano". Of the Cuaba range this vitola is the odd one out, having a flat cap instead of a pointed one. A small snip with the cutter and the pre-light draw doesn't reveal a great deal. Slightly woody taste, nothing too exciting. The cigar takes an easy light......then......BOOM!! I forget about this every time I light a perfecto....the first few draws are ALL wrapper. Fireworks all have instructions on them that say something like "Light touch paper and stand well back". Perfecto's, in my opinion, should carry a similar warning. Verrrry nice - verrrry sweet ! When the burn reaches the main body of the cigar, the initial, light, sweet smoke gives way to a rewarding cloud of smoke and the cigar settles into a steady rhythm. Spicy, deep flavours erupt on the taste buds but with a hint of the sweetness still evident. The draw is effortless - nice and easy and the burn is completely even. Fantastic construction. One of the fundamentals of the universe is that humans will always try to make 1 + 1 = 3. Confused ? Let me explain. We find it impossible to content ourselves with anything "au naturale" and have a need to find something complementary for everything - to make the experience greater than the sum of it's parts. Cigars are no exception. We have to add salt to our foods, cream to our coffees and alcoholic drinks to cigars. When we do reach the required combination though......oh boy !! So....after the first few puffs of the wrapper have abated and I have the first "real" taste of the cigar still in my mouth - I head to the liquor cabinet in pursuit of the "3" factor. Looking for something to match the sweet, earthy taste my hand lingers on the Havana Club 7 year old rum but a last minute impulse makes me go for the Southern Comfort. I pour myself a generous measure over ice and settle into my leather chair. Let the ride begin. The smoke's aroma and the flavours are intensifying with each steady draw on the "uphill" section as the girth of the cigar widens, the flavour a little reminiscent of one of my favourites, Romeo y Julieta Cedros No 3 but unique enough to be able to separate the two. The burn of the cigar is completely even and the ash is a crunchy dark grey. This cigar is proving to be a little revelation. With each draw the flavour evolves and surprises. Not a cigar that could ever be described as flat or monotone then. Somewhere in the back of my mind a little voice is whispering "Never judge a book by it's cover". I had imagined this cigar would be an ok smoke but nothing special. Sometimes it's a definite pleasure to be proven completely wrong. (If anyone ever tells the wife I said that - I'll flat deny it) Small sips of the Southern Comfort replace some of the sweetness lost as the cigar reaches the middle. This is the widest point of the cigar and so the wrapper is providing less in terms of overall taste. The flavour is now definitely like smooth hazelnut praline with a little of the spicy signature that can be found in all Cuban cigars. I'm now cresting the apex point of the cigar and from here the cigar tapers gently towards it's ultimate end. The smoke has a creamy, silky texture and is staying cool, quite surprising for a shorter cigar. With each draw now, the width of the cigar is decreasing, the ride slowing and as the wrapper again begins to exert more influence over the taste the sweetness is returning. Yet, just as you think you have this cigar pegged, it alters subtly and the next draw has something new and different to marvel at. The Southern Comfort was a good choice, it's flavour merging with the cigar's different nuances instead of overpowering it or being lost in it. The smoke now has a gentle warmth to it and I'm determined to extract every last ounce of pleasure from this fine cigar. Unfortunately, I can't hold it anymore, I'm starting to burn my lips and fingers but the last couple of puffs had a delicious, almost vanilla sweetness to them and as I reluctantly let this slip from my fingers into the ash-tray I have to admit to being a little sad. Then the grin returns. The Cuaba sampler I ordered has another of these and six bigger brothers to go with it. That's a nice thought. So, there you have it. A roller coaster ride from a cigar in 45 minutes and all of 4 inches. (you can insert your own double-entendres here). Although lacking the power necessary to be an after-dinner cigar, one of these after a good lunch would certainly hit the spot. There are three distinct stages to the cigar - a tempting starter, a large main course and a seductively sweet dessert but the gentle evolution from stage to stage is a delight. This is a must-try figurado, sure to become a modern day classic but hey, THIS was how all cigars USED to be. Maybe those Taino Indians knew a thing or two ?
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by Staff on Friday 03 June, 2016
Reviewed by Kevin Reed First a little background on the Cuaba brand for those needing a little hard fact. Up until the beginning of this century, the figurado shape (or perfecto if we're being picky), pointed at both ends and bulbous in the middle, was the most popular in the world. With figurado's returning to fashion in the mid-90's, Cuaba was introduced in London in 1996, the brand being the first new Cuban cigar brand to be introduced into commercial production since 1968. Cuaba is the Taino Indian word for the special Cuban bush used to light the "Cohiba" or "Tobacco" on the Island used during religious ceremonies. Cuaba cigars are made at the Romeo y Julieta Factory (now Briones Montoto) under the supervision of Master Roller Izquierdo Gonzalez. This figurado shape is very difficult to make as it has to be made without the use of a cigar mould so don't be surprised if, upon opening a box, you find that no two cigars are identical. Rolled on the thighs of Cuban virgins ? Doubtful. But rolled on the thighs of a master of his art ? Very possibly. We shall see. OK..the history lesson's over, now to the cigar You know how some cigars just feel right when you hold them ? Picking one of these up is a small pleasure in itself. For a short cigar, they're very tactile, very ergonomic. A quick examination shows a relatively vein-free, rustic looking colorado-maduro wrapper. Of the Cuaba range this vitola is the odd one out, having a flat cap instead of a pointed one. A small snip with the cutter and the pre-light draw doesn't reveal a great deal. Slightly woody taste, nothing too exciting. The cigar takes an easy light then BOOM!! One of the fun bits about smoking a perfecto .the first few draws are ALL wrapper. Very nice - very sweet ! When the burn reaches the main body of the cigar, the initial light sweet smoke gives way to a rewarding cloud and the cigar settles into a steady rhythm. Spicy, deep flavours erupt on the taste buds but with a hint of the sweetness still evident. The draw is effortless - nice and easy and the burn is completely even. Fantastic construction. When the burn reaches the main body of the cigar, the initial light sweet smoke gives way to a rewarding cloud and the cigar settles into a steady rhythm. Spicy, deep flavours erupt on the taste buds but with a hint of the sweetness still evident. The draw is effortless - nice and easy and the burn is completely even. Fantastic construction. One of the fundamentals of the universe is that humans will always try to make 1 + 1 = 3. Confused ? Let me explain. We find it impossible to content ourselves with anything au naturale and have a need to find something complementary for everything to make the experience greater than the sum of it's parts. Cigars are no exception. We add salt to our foods, cream to our coffees and alcoholic drinks to cigars. When we do reach the required combination though....oh boy !! So. after the first few puffs of the wrapper have abated and I have the first real taste of the cigar still in my mouth - I head to the liquor cabinet in pursuit of the "3" factor. Looking for something to match the sweet, earthy taste my hand lingers on the Havana Club 7 year old rum but a last minute impulse makes me go for the Ron Zacapa. I pour myself a generous measure over ice and settle into my leather chair. Let the ride begin. The smoke's aroma and the flavours are intensifying with each steady draw as the girth of the cigar widens, the flavour a little reminiscent of a Romeo y Julieta Cedros No 3 but unique enough to be able to separate the two. The burn of the cigar is completely even and the ash is a crunchy dark grey. This cigar is proving to be a little revelation. With each draw the flavour evolves and surprises. I had imagined this cigar would be an ok smoke but nothing special. Sometimes it's a definite pleasure to be completely wrong. (If anyone ever tells the wife I said that... I'll flat deny it) Small sips of the Ron Z replace some of the sweetness lost as the cigar reaches the middle. This is the widest point of the cigar and so the wrapper is providing less in terms of overall taste. The flavour is now definitely like smooth hazelnut praline with a little of the spicy signature that can be found in Cuban cigars. I'm now cresting the apex point of the cigar and from here the cigar tapers gently towards it's ultimate end. The smoke has a creamy, silky texture and is staying cool, quite surprising for a shorter cigar. With each draw now, the width of the cigar is decreasing and the wrapper again begins to exert more influence over the taste the sweetness is returning. Yet, just as you think you have this cigar pegged, it alters subtly and the next draw has something new and different to marvel at. The Ron Z was a good choice, it's flavour merging with the cigar's different nuances instead of overpowering it or being lost in it. The smoke now has a gentle warmth to it yet I'm determined to extract every last ounce of pleasure from this cigar. Unfortunately, I can't hold it anymore, I'm starting to burn my lips and fingers but the last couple of puffs had a delicious, almost vanilla sweetness to them and as I reluctantly let this slip from my fingers into the ash-tray. So, there you have it. Although lacking the power necessary to be an after-dinner cigar, one of these after a good lunch would certainly hit the spot. This is a must-try figurado, sure to become a modern day classic but hey, THIS was how all cigars USED to be. Maybe those Taino Indians knew a thing or two ? Excellent review! Description of the setting and overall smoking experience was "just" enough, not drawn out. It actually made my desire to try these cigars even stronger. Judge: Bill Durkin Score 9/10 An excellent review, which would fit wonderfully in any cigar publication. The writer gives a history lesson, delves into the human thought process and describes his smoking experience in a manner which maintained my interest completely. Judge: Elliot Blum Score 10/10 Well, I guess it wasn't to bad, a bit long - I could have done with knowing what Ron Zacapa rum tasted like, but I'll leave that for another time. The review was pretty much a bio on a chap's cigar moment rather than a review of the cigar. I would have liked to know what age the cigar was (if known) and what other cigars the reviewer liked to get an idea of what the mark was against in this reviewers eyes. On the whole not too out there. Judge: Richard Whitwell Score: 5/10 OVERALL SCORE: 24/30
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Displaying 1 to 5 (of 16 reviews)
Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  [Next >>] 

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